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In this episode of the Science of Selling STEM, I’ll be having a chat with Andy Reimink, the CEO at HOH Water Technology, Inc., a third-generation family business serving customers in the industrial water treatment space. He is a strong sales professional with skills in customer relationship management, negotiation, budgeting, and water treatment. Andy will share his extensive sales wisdom and teach us how we can thrive as sales managers at different levels of the corporate ladder.

On Today’s Episode of the Science of Selling STEM:

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Transcript
Wesleyne Greer:

As a sales manager, you are judged by the

Wesleyne Greer:

performance of your team, and you're praised when they do

Wesleyne Greer:

well. But one thing that you've not been able to figure out is

Wesleyne Greer:

how to get everyone on your team consistently hitting quota every

Wesleyne Greer:

single month. On the Snack size sales podcast, we discuss the

Wesleyne Greer:

science of selling stem sales leadership in the science,

Wesleyne Greer:

technology, engineering and manufacturing fields is

Wesleyne Greer:

difficult. You will learn from sales managers just like you

Wesleyne Greer:

that will give you actionable insights and tips on how to

Wesleyne Greer:

develop as a leader and achieve your revenue targets every

Wesleyne Greer:

single month. So pop your headphones in and get ready to

Wesleyne Greer:

listen to my guests today. They will give you information and

Wesleyne Greer:

inspiration to ensure that you have actionable insights that

Wesleyne Greer:

you can put into place today. Hello, and welcome to another

Wesleyne Greer:

episode of the snack sized sales podcast. today. My guest is Andy

Wesleyne Greer:

Reineke. With H O H water technology. How are you Andy?

Andy Relmink:

I'm doing well. Thank you for having me.

Wesleyne Greer:

Thanks so much for being here. Let me tell you

Wesleyne Greer:

a little bit more about Andy. He is the CEO of H O H water

Wesleyne Greer:

technology. This is a third generation family business

Wesleyne Greer:

serving customers in the industrial water treatment

Wesleyne Greer:

space. He grew up in West Michigan, and he's lived in

Wesleyne Greer:

Michigan, Florida and Illinois, since coming on board with H O H

Wesleyne Greer:

So a third generation water treatment facility. That's not

Wesleyne Greer:

something we hear about too often. Tell me about how you

Wesleyne Greer:

grew up in this business and how you got to where you are today.

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, so uh, watching the company, we are in

Andy Relmink:

the industrial water treatment space, which is basically we

Andy Relmink:

work with large industrial or commercial properties, treating

Andy Relmink:

the water that they use for heat transfer. And my wife's

Andy Relmink:

grandfather started HoH back in 1968, he was actually in the

Andy Relmink:

Navy. And a lot of people coming out of the Navy got their

Andy Relmink:

started water treatment, because back in the day, they powered

Andy Relmink:

these big naval ships with steam boilers. And so they would learn

Andy Relmink:

to do water treatment on the steam boilers come out of the

Andy Relmink:

Navy, and then find a career in water treatment in the private

Andy Relmink:

sector, treating a lot of steam boilers for heating and cooling

Andy Relmink:

or I guess heating, in this case of large commercial facilities

Andy Relmink:

or industrial complexes. So that's how he started it coming

Andy Relmink:

out of the Navy and started went off on his own and created Hoh,

Andy Relmink:

and then my father in law succeeded him. And I got into

Andy Relmink:

it. When I married my wife to some degree, we got married, and

Andy Relmink:

I didn't know really anything about what her dad was doing. I

Andy Relmink:

was in a real estate background. And in a small startup with some

Andy Relmink:

friends, I had no intention of joining the family business. And

Andy Relmink:

it was when my wife and I were about to have kids. And I

Andy Relmink:

thought that maybe a career change with something more

Andy Relmink:

stable would be a good idea that I approached my father in law to

Andy Relmink:

say, hey, I'm interested. And if you need someone to help grow a

Andy Relmink:

territory, I would love a conversation. And so at that

Andy Relmink:

time, he was interested in someone in West Michigan, where

Andy Relmink:

we were living, and that started the process.

Wesleyne Greer:

So you're so this is you're on your wife's

Wesleyne Greer:

side, right? So you got married, and you saw your father in law

Wesleyne Greer:

running this company. And when I think that one thing that's very

Wesleyne Greer:

commendable of you is you said, hey, I want to grow a territory,

Wesleyne Greer:

not hand me the keys to the kingdom, let me be the sea CFO

Wesleyne Greer:

or the CFO. It was really you being humble saying, let me

Wesleyne Greer:

learn the business. Right. So tell me about when you first

Wesleyne Greer:

started. And you started essentially working for your

Wesleyne Greer:

father in law. How was that? Yeah,

Andy Relmink:

I mean, it was good. I mean, he was the

Andy Relmink:

president and CEO at the time. So I knew I wasn't going to be

Andy Relmink:

working obviously directly for him or have a lot of day to day

Andy Relmink:

interaction with him. My process of getting hired was similar to

Andy Relmink:

probably anyone I had an interview schedule. And you

Andy Relmink:

know, a bunch of interviews that I went on, at some point, I did

Andy Relmink:

interview with my father in law, and it was his common practice

Andy Relmink:

to try to interview everyone that was hired into the company.

Andy Relmink:

And, you know, I was pretty direct with him at the beginning

Andy Relmink:

about my ambitions and my goals of wanting to be in leadership,

Andy Relmink:

whether it'd be the CEO one day, or just, you know, a position of

Andy Relmink:

leadership within the company. But I was also very willing to

Andy Relmink:

start wherever I had to, to kind of prove myself and so I was

Andy Relmink:

hired in a more of a sales role. But at the time, we had a

Andy Relmink:

technician that was leaving the territory and actually going out

Andy Relmink:

to Arizona to work for us. And so when I first started, I spent

Andy Relmink:

about a year doing technician work, and in the field, hands

Andy Relmink:

dirty. really grinding away. And then on the free days that I'd

Andy Relmink:

have, I'd go out cold calling and knocking on doors. So I

Andy Relmink:

really did start and bowed at the bottom of the company and

Andy Relmink:

slowly worked my way up over time, which I appreciate. I

Andy Relmink:

think that gives a lot of perspective for me, as I've kind

Andy Relmink:

of progressed within the company,

Wesleyne Greer:

you know, if I had a crystal ball, and all

Wesleyne Greer:

companies had the time to do exactly what you did, that is

Wesleyne Greer:

really what I think all new salespeople need to do. So as a

Wesleyne Greer:

chemist, I tell people, I worked on both sides of supply chain, I

Wesleyne Greer:

was the person processing the samples, figuring out the

Wesleyne Greer:

failure analysis, doing all those things. Then when I

Wesleyne Greer:

started selling into those same types of environments, I

Wesleyne Greer:

understood what they were doing. And so as a salesperson, when

Wesleyne Greer:

you understand what your technicians are going through

Wesleyne Greer:

what the installers are going through how difficult how

Wesleyne Greer:

unhappy customers can be, it gives you so much more empathy

Wesleyne Greer:

as a salesperson and you really learn the product, there's no

Wesleyne Greer:

better way to learn your product, your service that

Wesleyne Greer:

you're selling, than to touch it, feel it every single day.

Wesleyne Greer:

Right?

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, and I love all your podcasts specifically

Andy Relmink:

focused on STEM and sales, because stem sales are, I think,

Andy Relmink:

its own unique thing. And we've had different thought processes

Andy Relmink:

throughout our history of saying like, you know, what, if we

Andy Relmink:

could just find a really great salesperson, we can train them,

Andy Relmink:

you know, our core competencies and business models and what we

Andy Relmink:

do, and right now, and this could change, you know, six

Andy Relmink:

times over the next 20 years, but right now I sit here go, I

Andy Relmink:

don't know if we can do that, like, I need someone with some

Andy Relmink:

background and some technical skills to be able to go into

Andy Relmink:

that into the field, because it's just so technical, often

Andy Relmink:

that someone that just, you know, knows how to make a great

Andy Relmink:

sales presentation is going to struggle, not knowing how to

Andy Relmink:

talk the lingo and and know what a piece of equipment does or why

Andy Relmink:

it does it. So yeah, starting from the bottom, I think is a

Andy Relmink:

great funnel process to like, bring someone into sales

Andy Relmink:

eventually.

Wesleyne Greer:

Yes, and you're so right. It's I do think that

Wesleyne Greer:

from my standpoint, I don't think somebody has to

Wesleyne Greer:

necessarily be I call it an industry insider, or more

Wesleyne Greer:

eloquently, I say your competitors rejects. I don't

Wesleyne Greer:

think that they need to be that. But they do need to be technical

Wesleyne Greer:

in some way. Right. So again, I was a chemist, and I saw capital

Wesleyne Greer:

equipment. I was a chemist, and I still specialty chemicals.

Wesleyne Greer:

Yeah, I didn't know everything about these, you know,

Wesleyne Greer:

speciality chemicals, but I could learn it. And I was smart

Wesleyne Greer:

enough to know, okay, this plus this equals this, say this to a

Wesleyne Greer:

customer. So really ensuring that you're looking in the right

Wesleyne Greer:

niche. Right. So okay, do I need somebody with an engineering

Wesleyne Greer:

background? Do I need somebody who's a physicist, because if

Wesleyne Greer:

you get somebody off the street, like, who's selling cell phones,

Wesleyne Greer:

they don't have that technical know how, and it's really the

Wesleyne Greer:

fact that their sales process is quick. And so they don't have to

Wesleyne Greer:

be really in depth. They don't have to build that bridge. They

Wesleyne Greer:

don't have to be the customers consultant and walk lockstep

Wesleyne Greer:

with them. But so I do you think what you're saying has so much

Wesleyne Greer:

validity, and there's always that fine line, and I focus on

Wesleyne Greer:

STEM sales, because it's different, you know, everything,

Wesleyne Greer:

it's, you have to be a technical salesperson, you're not a

Wesleyne Greer:

salesperson, you're a technical salesperson. And that technical

Wesleyne Greer:

piece is so crucial.

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, and I don't, I don't think that, you know, I

Andy Relmink:

would ever stick to absolute like this will never work. But I

Andy Relmink:

think as sales managers, we need to be very cognizant of, if I'm

Andy Relmink:

going to choose someone outside of the industry, the learning

Andy Relmink:

curve is going to be longer. And I'm going to have to be more

Andy Relmink:

patient with that person, because it's just going to take

Andy Relmink:

time. So where someone coming from the industry, I could say,

Andy Relmink:

You know what, we could ramp them up in a year from now I

Andy Relmink:

expect them to be killing it crushing their quotas, whereas

Andy Relmink:

someone else I might have to really alter their quotas, and

Andy Relmink:

be patient with how they progress and grow

Wesleyne Greer:

patients. That is the key. Because when I go

Wesleyne Greer:

in, and I'm working with organizations, I always say they

Wesleyne Greer:

say so whistling, what do you think about this person or that

Wesleyne Greer:

person? And I'm like, I'm not gonna tell you to fire anybody.

Wesleyne Greer:

But I'm gonna say it's gonna take this long to get this

Wesleyne Greer:

person up to speed and this long and get that person up to speed.

Wesleyne Greer:

Do you have the bandwidth and the patience to know that this

Wesleyne Greer:

person you hired who doesn't have the skill set? And a lot of

Wesleyne Greer:

times for me, it's like, they have no sales experience and no

Wesleyne Greer:

technical experience. I'm like, Come on, guys. They need one or

Wesleyne Greer:

the other good. They have some sales experience or some

Wesleyne Greer:

technical experience. If you hire somebody who just seems

Wesleyne Greer:

good, that doesn't really work. And it's patient. So you went

Wesleyne Greer:

from your salesperson, and then you transition into sales

Wesleyne Greer:

leadership. So tell us about that. How that transition was

Wesleyne Greer:

for you. Yeah,

Andy Relmink:

it was a fairly natural step. I was I had

Andy Relmink:

started to have some success in West Michigan and growing that

Andy Relmink:

territory. And then we had a sales manager in Florida that

Andy Relmink:

was retiring. And so we're looking for replacement and I

Andy Relmink:

was approached to say would you have interest in uprooting your

Andy Relmink:

family moving down to Florida and running this division for us

Andy Relmink:

and so I saw it as a great opportunity to get experience in

Andy Relmink:

sales management where I hadn't had a ton of that before. And I

Andy Relmink:

think my wife is, you know, great that she's always willing

Andy Relmink:

to go take an adventure and move somewhere that, you know, we

Andy Relmink:

didn't really know anyone. And so we went down to Florida, and

Andy Relmink:

I managed a team down there for three years. And that that was a

Andy Relmink:

great experience. Overall, I've moved a handful of times in my

Andy Relmink:

life, and not one of them have I ever regretted, I think anyone

Andy Relmink:

who has a chance to move somewhere, especially away from

Andy Relmink:

like their hometown, even if it's for two or three years, I

Andy Relmink:

would seize that opportunity, because you just get so much

Andy Relmink:

from it, seeing a different perspective, a different place,

Andy Relmink:

something that you're kind of out of your comfort zone with.

Andy Relmink:

And

Wesleyne Greer:

so as a brand new sales manager that took over

Wesleyne Greer:

an existing team, what were some of the challenges some of the

Wesleyne Greer:

things that you experienced? I mean,

Andy Relmink:

I think with sales management, at least in my

Andy Relmink:

experience, like it all comes down to people. And so I had to

Andy Relmink:

assess the people we had, obviously, there was going to be

Andy Relmink:

a different dynamic, I was thrust into a hard situation

Andy Relmink:

where I was a very young individual in a sales leadership

Andy Relmink:

role down there, where I had one of the sales persons working for

Andy Relmink:

me was in their lower 60s. So there's naturally going to be

Andy Relmink:

some tension with I've been doing this, you know, since you

Andy Relmink:

were in diapers, and you know, who do you think you are kind of

Andy Relmink:

a thing. So that was for sure tough and a lot of great

Andy Relmink:

learning experiences. And while we were down there, we acquired

Andy Relmink:

a company. So we brought on some new team members that we had to

Andy Relmink:

integrate into the company, but also the team, we had to assess

Andy Relmink:

those. And then a handful of them did not end up working out.

Andy Relmink:

And then we did some hiring. So we brought in some new people.

Andy Relmink:

So I have a great firsthand experience of going out to the

Andy Relmink:

field and finding a salesperson that did not have any technical

Andy Relmink:

background. And, you know, hiring them because of the

Andy Relmink:

potential I saw and working through what was especially in

Andy Relmink:

the beginning a very painful process, but ended up being a

Andy Relmink:

success story. And so now they're still in the in the

Andy Relmink:

field in the market, and they're doing a great job. But yeah, I

Andy Relmink:

dabbled in a lot of different issues. Well, at my time in

Andy Relmink:

Florida.

Wesleyne Greer:

So within three years, you had a established

Wesleyne Greer:

sales team with a lot of and you know, I think in this time that

Wesleyne Greer:

we're in, there are a lot of salespeople who've always

Wesleyne Greer:

they've never wanted to become go into management, their career

Wesleyne Greer:

comfortable being in sales, because I mean, I think we know

Wesleyne Greer:

that the dirty little secret becoming a sales manager, when

Wesleyne Greer:

you first start, you actually make a little bit less money

Wesleyne Greer:

than you did as a salesperson, right. And so a lot of

Wesleyne Greer:

salespeople know that. And so they're getting up there in age,

Wesleyne Greer:

right? So they're in their 50s and 60s. And then you know, you

Wesleyne Greer:

have this new tenacious, excited person coming in, like I'm

Wesleyne Greer:

managing you. Now, not only did you have that, but then you have

Wesleyne Greer:

to rebuild the team, you had to have some attrition let some

Wesleyne Greer:

people go. But it sounds like in three years after you did that

Wesleyne Greer:

your next step was where,

Andy Relmink:

so my next step, so we decided that we actually

Andy Relmink:

wanted to divest of our Florida Division. And so we sold it off.

Andy Relmink:

And so I went down there manager team, we acquired a company, and

Andy Relmink:

then we sold it off. And then I moved up to the Chicagoland area

Andy Relmink:

where our headquarters is out of. And so I came up here, and I

Andy Relmink:

actually took if you look at maybe a company hierarchy, I

Andy Relmink:

took a step down where I did not come into sales management, I

Andy Relmink:

came back into a sales role moving up into Chicagoland. And

Andy Relmink:

I did that for about a year. And then we had created a new role

Andy Relmink:

called a Channel Sales Manager, that I interviewed and accepted

Andy Relmink:

that role, and really worked at looking at different kinds of

Andy Relmink:

partnerships that we could make with other companies, different

Andy Relmink:

forms of how to get, you know, our product out into the space.

Andy Relmink:

And I did that for a while before becoming vice president

Andy Relmink:

of sales, which is a title that I also technically retained

Andy Relmink:

today.

Wesleyne Greer:

So tell me, how did you accept that, I have to

Wesleyne Greer:

take a step back in order to take a step forward, going from

Wesleyne Greer:

managing a sales team being kind of autonomous, going back into

Wesleyne Greer:

the individual contributor role.

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, and I think that's a really hard thing to do

Andy Relmink:

for anyone, it's, you know, going the opposite direction of

Andy Relmink:

where you're trying to go. And I'm a person that has always

Andy Relmink:

had, you know, pretty clear ambitions, and in taking a step

Andy Relmink:

away from that ultimate goal of where I'm trying to go, is hard

Andy Relmink:

to deal with. And so I tried to look at the big picture and what

Andy Relmink:

my ultimate goals were, and, you know, basically convinced myself

Andy Relmink:

that taking a step to the side or back does not change where

Andy Relmink:

I'm going, it's just altering the path of how I'm going to get

Andy Relmink:

there. And so if it takes a little longer, that's okay. If I

Andy Relmink:

have to, you know, do a little jog in the road, I'm fine with

Andy Relmink:

that, but it wasn't going to change, you know, my ultimate

Andy Relmink:

goal and where I was trying to reach

Wesleyne Greer:

and you know, I think that probably somewhere in

Wesleyne Greer:

the back If your mind you're like, Well, I'm going to

Wesleyne Greer:

headquarters. So maybe there'll be more visibility, maybe

Wesleyne Greer:

there'll be more opportunities for me, right. And I think that

Wesleyne Greer:

a lot of times, especially in sales, for those people who want

Wesleyne Greer:

to get into leadership or want to get into management, it's

Wesleyne Greer:

hard for them to take a step back, right? It's because it's

Wesleyne Greer:

like, I've been managing people. And now I have to be managed,

Wesleyne Greer:

I've been doing pipeline reviews, now my I have somebody

Wesleyne Greer:

who's going to be reviewing my pipeline. And so really, I would

Wesleyne Greer:

say, just having your ego in check to understand that, Hey,

Wesleyne Greer:

it's okay. I'm doing this because there's future growth.

Wesleyne Greer:

And it seems like after a year, you weren't in the right place,

Wesleyne Greer:

you became the General Sales Manager, and then you were able

Wesleyne Greer:

to move into this VP of sales role. So today, as you say, you

Wesleyne Greer:

manage you're the VP of sales, as well as the president of the

Wesleyne Greer:

company. So how are you able to balance those two things?

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, that's a tough question. I, you know,

Andy Relmink:

it's weeks, I think that probably 80% of my time is spent

Andy Relmink:

doing, you know, sales manager, VP of sales type work and 20%

Andy Relmink:

CEO stuff. And some weeks, it's, you know, flip flopped, so

Andy Relmink:

understanding is not going to be perfect. And we're intentionally

Andy Relmink:

running a little lean right now. So I'm okay with it, we know

Andy Relmink:

that eventually, we'll hire, you know, a sales manager

Andy Relmink:

replacement to fill that seat. But for the time being,

Andy Relmink:

especially in the climate that we're in with what's going on,

Andy Relmink:

we're okay, that, you know, I'm wearing a couple of different

Andy Relmink:

hats. Some of the jobs that I'm doing, I think, pair well

Andy Relmink:

together, you know, still doing some higher level selling with

Andy Relmink:

customers, which I would, you know, and we'll be doing as a

Andy Relmink:

CEO, even when we have a sales manager, still trying to

Andy Relmink:

interact with our sales teams, as much as I can, and kind of

Andy Relmink:

charting the course for where we're trying to go. So I think

Andy Relmink:

they pair well together. But I know it's not a long term

Andy Relmink:

solution that we're going to try to stay in

Wesleyne Greer:

that once a salesperson I was a salesperson,

Wesleyne Greer:

I mean, we asked I mean, if you're really truly a

Wesleyne Greer:

salesperson, it's hard to to let that go. So you saying that

Wesleyne Greer:

you'll be involved in some higher level deals, it's because

Wesleyne Greer:

you want to not because you have to.

Andy Relmink:

That's so true. And I went out with one of our

Andy Relmink:

salespeople two weeks ago, and we did some cold calling, and I

Andy Relmink:

haven't cold called in a while. And we did about a day and a

Andy Relmink:

half of it. And we walked in nor dock or door knocked, you know,

Andy Relmink:

30 different places. And I had so much fun. And we had a lot of

Andy Relmink:

success, like a much higher rate than I ever got, I think on my

Andy Relmink:

own. So I don't know, it might have been just like that day and

Andy Relmink:

the sun was shining, that people wanted to talk to us. But I came

Andy Relmink:

back up to the corporate office and my brother in law's the CEO

Andy Relmink:

was like, Man, you seem lively today. And he's like, is your

Andy Relmink:

bucket full right now, like it is kind of fall like I just had

Andy Relmink:

a blast cold calling. So yeah, there is something just, you

Andy Relmink:

know, inside a salesperson that kind of gets them going when

Andy Relmink:

they do certain activities,

Wesleyne Greer:

and that you know, inherent need that you

Wesleyne Greer:

have or that desire, I'm imagining that's what makes you

Wesleyne Greer:

really good and effective as a VP of sales. Because one thing

Wesleyne Greer:

that you know, a lot of salespeople say or think is if

Wesleyne Greer:

you haven't walked the day in my shoes, then you really can't

Wesleyne Greer:

give me advice. But you're like, I just want to have that cold

Wesleyne Greer:

calling. So if I can do that, you can do that. Right? So it's

Wesleyne Greer:

very, it's much easier for you to say that. So a lot of times,

Wesleyne Greer:

when you're in companies of your size, there's a battle between

Wesleyne Greer:

the CEO and the VP of sales in terms of what the CEO wants and

Wesleyne Greer:

what the VP of Sales wants. Right? So since you're operating

Wesleyne Greer:

in both of those modes, I'm curious as to when you have

Wesleyne Greer:

those battles of this is good for the sales organization, but

Wesleyne Greer:

maybe it's not good for the company, or vice versa. How do

Wesleyne Greer:

you get through those internal battles?

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, I think it's actually, to me, it's easy,

Andy Relmink:

because I'm having the conversation myself. So a lot of

Andy Relmink:

the battles that we might see as a sales leader, you know, VP of

Andy Relmink:

sales, saying, I need more salespeople, I need to take them

Andy Relmink:

here and here because we need to have these growth targets. And

Andy Relmink:

then the VB going well, we got budgets, and we can't do

Andy Relmink:

everything. And so I'm aware of both sides of those coins. And

Andy Relmink:

so at some level, it's not me alone, we have a great

Andy Relmink:

leadership team that we work with, but at some level, we're

Andy Relmink:

making that decision together and saying, all right, is it

Andy Relmink:

worth the risk to go maybe outside the budget to stick

Andy Relmink:

someone here with the expectation that sales are going

Andy Relmink:

to do X. And so it is a very fluid process that we're kind

Andy Relmink:

of, you know, toiling through what's in the best interest of

Andy Relmink:

the company, but also in hitting sales targets. So I'm fairly

Andy Relmink:

pragmatic about it. Like I'm not interested in hitting sales

Andy Relmink:

targets for the fun of hitting sales targets. If we're gonna

Andy Relmink:

hit sales targets, I want them to affect the bottom line and

Andy Relmink:

actually progress some of the company goals too. So

Wesleyne Greer:

so you don't have that VP of sales hat that

Wesleyne Greer:

says we'll win by any means necessary because the CEO hacks

Wesleyne Greer:

because we still gotta make money.

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, exactly. Yes. I'm very aware of the

Andy Relmink:

bottom line of it all. And I guess that probably helps to in

Andy Relmink:

some capacity with the team And so our sales team probably knows

Andy Relmink:

more about what's going on with the company than say a lot of

Andy Relmink:

sales teams that just have a top line quota. So our team has a

Andy Relmink:

fairy, they have a top line quarter, they know what we're

Andy Relmink:

going for. But they also understand some of the cogs that

Andy Relmink:

are involved. And some of the overhead that we have. And, you

Andy Relmink:

know, what fun is it to, you know, do 20 more million dollars

Andy Relmink:

worth of sales, if we're gonna make the same profit? Like, we

Andy Relmink:

all feel good, but we actually were very inefficient in what we

Andy Relmink:

were doing.

Wesleyne Greer:

Yeah. So I always say that, you know, as a

Wesleyne Greer:

middle middle management, sales manager, even as a salesperson,

Wesleyne Greer:

when you think about discount, you always think about top down,

Wesleyne Greer:

how much can I discount? What can I discount? And that's a

Wesleyne Greer:

good sales leader, you think about bottom up? What's my

Wesleyne Greer:

margin? What's the lowest? How was the lowest margin that I can

Wesleyne Greer:

sell for them? Right? And so again, since you have that view,

Wesleyne Greer:

you're able to tell the team that so instead of that top down

Wesleyne Greer:

view, they're looking at bottom up, right? So they think about

Wesleyne Greer:

things in terms of that bottom up, and then help them be better

Wesleyne Greer:

salespeople? Because they understand hey, no, it doesn't

Wesleyne Greer:

make sense. Yeah, I need to walk away from this deal. Or maybe I

Wesleyne Greer:

shouldn't do this now. Because it doesn't make sense for the

Wesleyne Greer:

company.

Andy Relmink:

Yep. And our team is getting better at that every

Andy Relmink:

single day. But it's a learning process, right? We're all kind

Andy Relmink:

of figuring it out as we go.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome. So you kind of mentioned the success

Wesleyne Greer:

story in there a little bit. But as you look back at your career

Wesleyne Greer:

as a sales manager, or VP of sales, what is a who's a person,

Wesleyne Greer:

a team, a situation that you're really proud of today?

Andy Relmink:

Yeah, if I look back over the career, I would

Andy Relmink:

probably echo the one that I started on, which was down in

Andy Relmink:

Florida. And I mean, that was that was such a hard time we

Andy Relmink:

hired this individual. And they were struggling in the

Andy Relmink:

beginning. And I had a sales manager at the time, who was the

Andy Relmink:

the former former VP of Sales for our company. And I was going

Andy Relmink:

to him saying, like, what do I do here, like, the person is

Andy Relmink:

just not getting the job. I don't know what to do. It's

Andy Relmink:

early on, but I'm nervous. And he was very quick to be like,

Andy Relmink:

cut them, you're done. Like, let them go. And I was like, and I

Andy Relmink:

just couldn't, I'm like, this is our fault. Like, we hired him.

Andy Relmink:

And we should have done a better job on the front end, knowing

Andy Relmink:

what we were getting. And you know, to take this individual

Andy Relmink:

from the job that they're doing, bring them in house and just

Andy Relmink:

say, Oh, you're not really what I'm looking for. Like, I just I

Andy Relmink:

couldn't handle that. And so I went against what our VP of

Andy Relmink:

Sales said I should do. And I said, I'm not gonna cut on like,

Andy Relmink:

this is on me just as much as it is on him. And so I just worked

Andy Relmink:

more with them and what had more patients. And, you know, like I

Andy Relmink:

said, we divested of that area, but the company we sold to, he

Andy Relmink:

still works for this day. And he's doing great. And he's

Andy Relmink:

progressed along, and he's a key member of their team now. And I

Andy Relmink:

take a lot of pride in the fact that I stuck with them. And, you

Andy Relmink:

know, didn't give up.

Wesleyne Greer:

That's powerful. I love that story. Because so

Wesleyne Greer:

many times, that's the answer I just cut off. And I often ask

Wesleyne Greer:

sales managers, sales leaders, when they have that low

Wesleyne Greer:

performing person, I asked them to be introspective. And I say,

Wesleyne Greer:

have you given that person? The best of you? Have you invested?

Wesleyne Greer:

Have you coached them to the best of your ability? And most

Wesleyne Greer:

times they say no. And so I'm like, it's on you. It's not on

Wesleyne Greer:

them. Right. And I think you realize that you said it's on

Wesleyne Greer:

me, it's not on him. Let me invest more and your investment

Wesleyne Greer:

paid off dividends. Yeah, that's awesome. Andy, I've enjoyed our

Wesleyne Greer:

time together. If somebody wants to reach out to you, or get in

Wesleyne Greer:

contact with you, what is the one best way? One best

Andy Relmink:

way is probably LinkedIn. Obviously, they can

Andy Relmink:

search me at Andy Ryan MC, and you'll find me and send a

Andy Relmink:

message. I'm pretty accessible. So they could also just google

Andy Relmink:

search HHR technology and call our office and say I want to

Andy Relmink:

talk to Andy and you'll get through at some point in time.

Andy Relmink:

And so yeah, I'm pretty accessible. But yeah, LinkedIn

Andy Relmink:

is a very easy way.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome, LinkedIn. And I'm just gonna

Wesleyne Greer:

give people another little tip there. Hey, all you cold callers

Wesleyne Greer:

out there. Sometimes you you don't think that you can access

Wesleyne Greer:

the decision maker. But have you ever thought about just Googling

Wesleyne Greer:

them picking up the phone and asking me bachelor tenacity that

Wesleyne Greer:

like you said, at some point, they'll get patched through

Wesleyne Greer:

tenacity go. Awesome. Well, thank you so much, guys. Make

Wesleyne Greer:

sure you check out Andy on LinkedIn. And thanks again so

Wesleyne Greer:

much for joining me for this episode of the snack sized sales

Wesleyne Greer:

podcast and remember in everything that you do transform

Wesleyne Greer:

your sales until next time,

Wesleyne Greer:

thank you for joining us today on the snack sized sales

Wesleyne Greer:

podcast. If you enjoyed this episode, subscribe and leave us

Wesleyne Greer:

a review. Learn how to continue increasing your bottom line by

Wesleyne Greer:

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Wesleyne Greer:

inbox weekly by going to www dot snack sized sales.com. Trust me,

Wesleyne Greer:

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