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In this episode of the Science of Selling STEM, I’ll be sitting down with Justin Musiek, the Director of sales training and enablement at Kate Farms, a medical nutrition company that offers plant-based tube feeding formulas and shakes for adults and children over the age of one. Justin Musiek comes on to share his insights on sales training and enablement and how he has built a sales training department within Kate Farms.

Justin has 15 years of successful sales experience in the pharmaceutical, medical device, and medical nutrition industries. Justin earned his master’s degree in Healthcare Administration at Saint Joseph’s College and his BA, political science at Lehigh University. Jason considers himself a through and through salesperson at heart who gravitates towards challenging roles and loves leaving a footprint.

He has previously worked at Takeda, a multinational pharmaceutical R&D-driven global biopharmaceutical company as a U.S Sales Training Manager-rare disease. Before That Justin worked at Boston Scientific, a manufacturer of medical devices as a Senior Territory manager/sales Trainer-Pulmonary Endoscopy.

On Today’s Episode of the Science of Selling STEM:

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Connect with Wesleyne Greer:

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Transcript
Wesleyne Greer:

As a sales manager, you are judged by the

Wesleyne Greer:

performance of your team, and you're praised when they do

Wesleyne Greer:

well. But one thing that you've not been able to figure out is

Wesleyne Greer:

how to get everyone on your team consistently hitting quota every

Wesleyne Greer:

single month. On the Snack size sales podcast, we discuss the

Wesleyne Greer:

science of selling stem sales leadership in the science,

Wesleyne Greer:

technology, engineering and manufacturing fields is

Wesleyne Greer:

difficult. You will learn from sales managers just like you

Wesleyne Greer:

that will give you actionable insights and tips on how to

Wesleyne Greer:

develop as a leader and achieve your revenue targets every

Wesleyne Greer:

single month. So pop your headphones in and get ready to

Wesleyne Greer:

listen to my guests today. They will give you information and

Wesleyne Greer:

inspiration to ensure that you have actionable insights that

Wesleyne Greer:

you can put into place today. Hello, and welcome to the Snack

Wesleyne Greer:

size sales podcast where we focus on the science of selling

Wesleyne Greer:

stem. Today I have the great pleasure of having Justin music

Wesleyne Greer:

of Kate farms with me. How are you, Justin?

Justin Musiek:

Good morning. Well, thanks for having me.

Wesleyne Greer:

Thanks so much for being here. So let me tell

Wesleyne Greer:

you guys a bit about Justin. He's the director of sales

Wesleyne Greer:

training and enablement at Kate Farms, a plant based medical

Wesleyne Greer:

nutrition company, he has 15 years of successful sales and

Wesleyne Greer:

sales leadership experience across the pharmaceutical

Wesleyne Greer:

medical device and medical nutrition industries. So sales,

Wesleyne Greer:

training and enablement. Most companies don't even have that

Wesleyne Greer:

position. If you're outside of the tech world, how did you

Wesleyne Greer:

start your career and tell us how you got to where you are

Wesleyne Greer:

now?

Justin Musiek:

Absolutely. Well, I've always carried the bag in

Justin Musiek:

terms of sales since I graduated college. So I'm through and

Justin Musiek:

through a sales person at heart, that's where I started, I

Justin Musiek:

started with a small kind of mom and pop startup company in the

Justin Musiek:

medical device repair world. They cut my teeth for a little

Justin Musiek:

bit there. And then I moved into my first pharmaceutical sales

Justin Musiek:

job. And from there that kind of progressed, and I was able to

Justin Musiek:

take on more responsibilities, I was promoted into a specialty

Justin Musiek:

rep role within that company. And you know, along the way,

Justin Musiek:

just learned a lot about what what sales is what my style was,

Justin Musiek:

which was really important to kind of figure out my best

Justin Musiek:

approach in terms of engaging customers along the way. And

Justin Musiek:

from there, I continued to kind of work through the medical

Justin Musiek:

space. So I worked for a rare disease company, large fortune

Justin Musiek:

500 company there. And at that point, I was really, really

Justin Musiek:

interested in learning more about training development, that

Justin Musiek:

had always been kind of a curiosity for me. In addition to

Justin Musiek:

that I had performed well and had built kind of a good success

Justin Musiek:

story over the years. And so I was able to pivot a little bit

Justin Musiek:

from my professional trajectory from just as a territory manager

Justin Musiek:

and sales when I was at Boston Scientific and two more training

Justin Musiek:

opportunities. And you know, that seemed to really fit what I

Justin Musiek:

was looking to do see the skill set. And you know, from there,

Justin Musiek:

I've spent the last five years in sales, training, Field Sales,

Justin Musiek:

training, different sales, leadership positions. And now

Justin Musiek:

here I'm at Kate farms have been here just about two years as the

Justin Musiek:

director of sales training and enablement. So

Wesleyne Greer:

tell me about the difference of being the

Wesleyne Greer:

sales manager, a sales leader, and the person that's training

Wesleyne Greer:

those sales manager or leader within a company, right? I do

Wesleyne Greer:

that externally. So I show up, I do my thing, and I'm gone. But

Wesleyne Greer:

really talk to me about within a company, how that roll is for

Wesleyne Greer:

you.

Justin Musiek:

It is just different on each company you're

Justin Musiek:

at, right. So there's this interesting intersection of

Justin Musiek:

sales training versus sales, management versus leadership

Justin Musiek:

development. And all of these have to kind of correlate with

Justin Musiek:

each other. And I can tell you just from different companies,

Justin Musiek:

different industries, they all interact a little bit

Justin Musiek:

differently. And it's really important that I think to find

Justin Musiek:

that definition early as to what a sales managers roles and

Justin Musiek:

responsibilities are as the leader of their team, versus

Justin Musiek:

what that component of sales training and coaching should

Justin Musiek:

look clash of versus again, what what other kind of components

Justin Musiek:

within sales strategy and sales leadership look like. So there's

Justin Musiek:

no kind of cookie cutter response to that I've found over

Justin Musiek:

the years right some organizations really focus in on

Justin Musiek:

their sales managers taking a training lead and having more

Justin Musiek:

autonomy around that. Other companies do invest in invest

Justin Musiek:

heavily in a sales training department, or often called a

Justin Musiek:

learning and development department. That is a separate

Justin Musiek:

entity that helps to support the sales managers and their teams.

Justin Musiek:

So it really just depends where you're at. I've been lucky to be

Justin Musiek:

a companies that really do value that ongoing training and

Justin Musiek:

learning continuum and they put the resources there and

Justin Musiek:

certainly I followed that, because that's been an interest

Justin Musiek:

of mine, as well. So

Wesleyne Greer:

one thing, you know, in this field that we work

Wesleyne Greer:

in this stem field is heavily scientific field, I feel that in

Wesleyne Greer:

some ways we're behind, if you will, a lot of the, I always

Wesleyne Greer:

like to say, tech companies, because you know, you go into

Wesleyne Greer:

any of these tech companies, no matter how big or small, they I

Wesleyne Greer:

mean, even startups have like a learning and development person,

Wesleyne Greer:

right. And so where we're just starting on that trend, I'm

Wesleyne Greer:

curious for you, because you are not just a learning and

Wesleyne Greer:

development person, you're focused on the sales training,

Wesleyne Greer:

right, within a company. So if a company is at that stage, where

Wesleyne Greer:

they're like, Okay, we need some ongoing learning and

Wesleyne Greer:

development, and we want to focus on the sales team, the

Wesleyne Greer:

sales leadership, what are some of the first things that they

Wesleyne Greer:

need to do to understand what their internal needs are?

Justin Musiek:

So I think, again, a lot of ways to cut this

Justin Musiek:

up, but I think where you'd start, especially if you're a

Justin Musiek:

smaller company with limited resources, right, you have a lot

Justin Musiek:

of priorities. Where do you where do you begin? You know,

Justin Musiek:

one of the things we work on and keep Farms is really developing

Justin Musiek:

our field for your field training team, right. So these

Justin Musiek:

are your top performers that have shown success in the field,

Justin Musiek:

you bring them in, and you kind of promote them into a player

Justin Musiek:

coach role. So really, they're the eyes and ears, within their

Justin Musiek:

regions. They're the ones working directly with their,

Justin Musiek:

their directors or region managers. And frankly, they're

Justin Musiek:

the ones that are the experts, right? They may need more

Justin Musiek:

development in terms of how to train people on how to develop

Justin Musiek:

the theoretical approach to it. But they're the ones that have

Justin Musiek:

shown success and can really be the ones that connect closely to

Justin Musiek:

build rapport with their team. So I would probably start there

Justin Musiek:

before you begin building out what may be necessary at one

Justin Musiek:

point, but before you build out a further l&d approach,

Justin Musiek:

definitely try to engage in develop your your people, your

Justin Musiek:

field sales leaders, first to begin building that component

Justin Musiek:

company, where we are at Kate Farms is I am the sales training

Justin Musiek:

lead, obviously, at the company. But we do a lot of work with our

Justin Musiek:

field reps, and we have a number of them across the country. And

Justin Musiek:

that really helped to onboard or to help ensure ongoing training

Justin Musiek:

and success within the field.

Wesleyne Greer:

So I really liked the model that you guys

Wesleyne Greer:

have employed because to me, you've become so a couple of

Wesleyne Greer:

different things. One, you are putting a person who's lived

Wesleyne Greer:

that life, or who essentially has done that job, you're

Wesleyne Greer:

putting them into that position of leadership. And so they know

Wesleyne Greer:

what's happening, one of the biggest pushback you get from

Wesleyne Greer:

salespeople is and they never did this, they don't know what

Wesleyne Greer:

they're talking about, Oh, what did they do it bla bla bla bla,

Wesleyne Greer:

right. So I think that's one great thing. And then there's

Wesleyne Greer:

another piece of the growth because so many times

Wesleyne Greer:

salespeople, they don't see growth potential if they want to

Wesleyne Greer:

get into leadership, and the company is based in Germany, or

Wesleyne Greer:

in California, it's like I'm not moving there. So I can never be

Wesleyne Greer:

a salesperson. But you've essentially created a position

Wesleyne Greer:

and you've created that roadmap for someone who is interested in

Wesleyne Greer:

becoming a leader, a sales manager, like these are the

Wesleyne Greer:

steps to get there. I couldn't agree

Justin Musiek:

with you more. That's something I was thinking

Justin Musiek:

about too, and kind of prepping for the podcast. And I felt that

Justin Musiek:

throughout stages of my career was Where do you go, if you're a

Justin Musiek:

salesperson, and you want further acclamation to different

Justin Musiek:

roles within the organization, I think traditionally, salespeople

Justin Musiek:

feel siloed in a sense from the rest of the organizational

Justin Musiek:

structure, right. And it's because we are salespeople,

Justin Musiek:

that's what we've done. And that's our identity. And we're

Justin Musiek:

really good at it doesn't mean everyone needs to move into a

Justin Musiek:

marketing role, or to a training role or anything like that. But

Justin Musiek:

I think especially for new sales managers, right, if you want to

Justin Musiek:

build that rapport, and really build that commitment base

Justin Musiek:

within your team is setting up an individual development plan.

Justin Musiek:

And being very committed to that because I think there is a sense

Justin Musiek:

that well, I'm in sales, where do I go next? How do I really

Justin Musiek:

leverage new skills and have a chance at other opportunities.

Justin Musiek:

And so this is the surefire way of doing it. It's a symbiotic

Justin Musiek:

approach, because they get the development they want. They

Justin Musiek:

become leaders within their teams, and we're getting an

Justin Musiek:

incredibly important valuable part of training accomplished

Justin Musiek:

with them in the field are engaging their fears. Hmm.

Wesleyne Greer:

Yeah, I really think that you guys have really

Wesleyne Greer:

done a really good job in terms of building out that training

Wesleyne Greer:

methodology in that path. And then even thinking about, you

Wesleyne Greer:

know, some people may want to go into a role of marketing, or

Wesleyne Greer:

maybe they want to go into executive leadership. Some

Wesleyne Greer:

people may want to be a sales manager and having those

Wesleyne Greer:

developing goals and saying, These are the tools that we have

Wesleyne Greer:

internally to help you be successful. At the end of the

Wesleyne Greer:

day. I'm assuming I'm not sure that your turnover is probably

Wesleyne Greer:

not really high.

Justin Musiek:

Yeah, we've had we're very young company, you

Justin Musiek:

know, certainly but yeah, we are committed to that and I know

Justin Musiek:

people feel confident that they will have a pass showing a path

Justin Musiek:

is important for every individual at a company and it's

Justin Musiek:

also a great motivator if you know you have a core quarterly

Justin Musiek:

Individual Development Plan, maybe an annual plan helps me as

Justin Musiek:

your leader and helps them to really, you know, communicate

Justin Musiek:

that and work towards it. Very important.

Wesleyne Greer:

So you've been a K farms for two years. And when

Wesleyne Greer:

you first started, I'm curious as to when you first started to

Wesleyne Greer:

where you are now, what are some of the the things that you've

Wesleyne Greer:

instituted into the organization that have really helped you guys

Wesleyne Greer:

grow?

Justin Musiek:

Yeah, so obviously, end of the day, it's

Justin Musiek:

about moving the number and exceeding goals, then you can

Justin Musiek:

never take your eye off of that. But I've learned over time, and

Justin Musiek:

again, as an individual contributor, progressing through

Justin Musiek:

my career to becoming a trainer and director, it's important you

Justin Musiek:

meet people where they're at. And what I mean by that is being

Justin Musiek:

as a leader able to flex and accommodate their learning

Justin Musiek:

styles, their selling styles, personality styles, all of these

Justin Musiek:

things have to be accounted for when you're a sales leader. I

Justin Musiek:

think, as most sales leaders or new newly minted managers, you

Justin Musiek:

want to kind of replicate how you've done something, because

Justin Musiek:

you've done it well. And you know, you've been promoted,

Justin Musiek:

potentially, because of it. And that becomes a cookie cutter

Justin Musiek:

approach. And that doesn't always work for everyone is if

Justin Musiek:

you have 789 people on the team really engaged. So you know, one

Justin Musiek:

thing I've really learned is you have to be able to accommodate

Justin Musiek:

each individual, if you're gonna get the most from them.

Justin Musiek:

Oftentimes, it might feel like a lateral sidestep in terms of

Justin Musiek:

what our overall goal is, that's to move a number and improve

Justin Musiek:

revenue. But if you do it, then and you commit to that approach,

Justin Musiek:

you'll pay dividends in the future, because they're gonna be

Justin Musiek:

confident in who they are with their customers, you're gonna

Justin Musiek:

feel like they're really, really valued, and they're gonna know

Justin Musiek:

you understand what they need.

Wesleyne Greer:

So I have this whole, this trajectory, and this

Wesleyne Greer:

picture, I like to paint for people, it's of becoming a new

Wesleyne Greer:

sales manager. So it's okay, I'm at the top of my game, I'm

Wesleyne Greer:

always on the leaderboards, I feel like I've done everything I

Wesleyne Greer:

can in my sales position, I'm ready for growth. So you get

Wesleyne Greer:

that position as a new sales manager, you're really, really

Wesleyne Greer:

excited. And then six months and your director starts beating you

Wesleyne Greer:

over the head, like you guys are not hitting quota, you're not

Wesleyne Greer:

doing this. And they realize that, oh my gosh, I knew how to

Wesleyne Greer:

sell. I knew how to manage my territory. But now I have seven

Wesleyne Greer:

or eight people, they don't think like me, they don't do

Wesleyne Greer:

what I do. They don't talk like me. And it's like that moment

Wesleyne Greer:

of, Oh, my goodness, can I take a demotion and just go back to

Wesleyne Greer:

making? Like, yeah, I was making because it's sales manager,

Wesleyne Greer:

really, initially, a lot of times you don't even make as

Wesleyne Greer:

much money. And then your comp plan is different, you usually

Wesleyne Greer:

are getting a bonus instead of commission. And so like all of

Wesleyne Greer:

these things, right? And so when you are able to chart that path

Wesleyne Greer:

and say, Okay, here's the intermediary step, and then

Wesleyne Greer:

here's your next step, right? And helping each person

Wesleyne Greer:

understand that, yes, this is what you did to be successful.

Wesleyne Greer:

But everybody on your team is different, right? They're all

Wesleyne Greer:

individuals. And if you don't have individual development

Wesleyne Greer:

plans and coaching plans for them, they're not going to be

Wesleyne Greer:

successful.

Justin Musiek:

Sales, leadership management is not for everyone,

Justin Musiek:

you know, and that's okay. That's perfectly fine. You know,

Justin Musiek:

some people enjoy the the individual autonomy, you have to

Justin Musiek:

really affect the organization that way. And but yeah, I think

Justin Musiek:

about our sales to their sales directors at K farm sales

Justin Musiek:

managers, but yeah, they you have to wear a lot of hats to do

Justin Musiek:

it effectively, it can be overwhelming. That's where

Justin Musiek:

hopefully training can get involved. If you have some of

Justin Musiek:

these other resources around you, they can help kind of walk

Justin Musiek:

walk along with you in terms of developing your people, adding

Justin Musiek:

leadership development capabilities is critical as

Justin Musiek:

well. And it's actually a sidenote is like, as you become

Justin Musiek:

a sales manager, you do become focused on the team and

Justin Musiek:

everything we said applies, but then how are you still

Justin Musiek:

developing? Are you getting what you need to be able to engage

Justin Musiek:

your team well, and get the leadership tools and

Justin Musiek:

capabilities that you need to continue to grow as well. So

Justin Musiek:

that's it goes for everyone stopped.

Wesleyne Greer:

And so you know, people may disagree with me, but

Wesleyne Greer:

you know, sales person by heart sales leader. And so I say that

Wesleyne Greer:

as sales manager, sales leader is one of the more difficult if

Wesleyne Greer:

not one of the most difficult jobs within the company.

Wesleyne Greer:

Because, again, you have all these different things, you have

Wesleyne Greer:

to develop as a leader, you have to manage the team, and you have

Wesleyne Greer:

to hit these revenue goals. Plus, you have to ensure that

Wesleyne Greer:

they have the skills that they need to actually sell. So you

Wesleyne Greer:

have to think about all of those different things and you have to

Wesleyne Greer:

balance right. So there's only finite time in the day in a

Wesleyne Greer:

week. And in order to make sure that you're still growing,

Wesleyne Greer:

you're growing each and every person on your team and you're

Wesleyne Greer:

hitting quota. Right. And so you're right. It's like all

Wesleyne Greer:

about putting all of those development goals together to

Wesleyne Greer:

make sure that the sales leader is a whole leader, right,

Wesleyne Greer:

they're not a micromanager. They moved on from being if they're

Wesleyne Greer:

not in that player coach role, then they are really not in the

Wesleyne Greer:

player coach role and defined player coach for me for us, I

Wesleyne Greer:

should say because I use it all the time and people like what

Wesleyne Greer:

does that even mean? What is the player coach

Justin Musiek:

the seals A player coach is someone who's

Justin Musiek:

still very much connected to the day to day process of reaching a

Justin Musiek:

sales quota. And you're, you're there to flex all of your skill

Justin Musiek:

sets as a salesperson by engaging some of the top

Justin Musiek:

customers potentially and playing that role. But also, of

Justin Musiek:

course, you're trying to develop and multiply your efforts with

Justin Musiek:

with your team at the same time, it can be a dangerous place to

Justin Musiek:

be for too long, as you said, because you have to and the

Justin Musiek:

hardest part is to start taking your hands off those reins and

Justin Musiek:

delegating the key word is to be able to delegate. And that's

Justin Musiek:

where you have to place some trust, whether it's fully earned

Justin Musiek:

yet or not. Sometimes you have to place that trust in other

Justin Musiek:

people like it field sales trainer lead, right, or, you

Justin Musiek:

know, offer some different leadership assignments within

Justin Musiek:

your team. Maybe you have a clinical specialist with your in

Justin Musiek:

your team that really focuses on you know, making sure your team

Justin Musiek:

understands the product basics, making sure you understand the

Justin Musiek:

product, the messaging. So that's how you start to really,

Justin Musiek:

I think, integrate a sales, leadership vision within your

Justin Musiek:

team. As you delegate, you're still being pulled in for some

Justin Musiek:

of the big picture calls some of the critical calls that are

Justin Musiek:

gonna move in number, but you're setting that expectation that

Justin Musiek:

there are other people on the team are going to help you pull

Justin Musiek:

the ball forward.

Wesleyne Greer:

Hmm, that's good. That's good. Like I say, I

Wesleyne Greer:

say it all the time, people like what is a player coach, I'm

Wesleyne Greer:

like, Yeah, this is what player coaches, and if your job is to

Wesleyne Greer:

be a player, coach, I think that's fine. But a lot of

Wesleyne Greer:

companies don't have the same structure, you guys have a cake

Wesleyne Greer:

farms. And so what ends up happening is a sales manager is

Wesleyne Greer:

a player coach, they're going on every call, they're closing all

Wesleyne Greer:

the big deals, they're still acting like they're a

Wesleyne Greer:

salesperson, they haven't moved into the management, mindset,

Wesleyne Greer:

mind frame and the 80% of the team who needs help and

Wesleyne Greer:

assistance and coaching, they're not even focusing on that. And

Wesleyne Greer:

that's where being a player coach in a company that hasn't

Wesleyne Greer:

set up things like you guys have, what's a development route

Wesleyne Greer:

can really be detrimental.

Justin Musiek:

Again, every company is a little bit

Justin Musiek:

different, right? Smaller companies this, this is the

Justin Musiek:

challenge for a smaller company with with new sales managers

Justin Musiek:

against finding the right the right balance there, because

Justin Musiek:

maybe you are absolutely being dependent on buyer company to

Justin Musiek:

drive the number in your capacity as a share, co share.

Justin Musiek:

But you know, at the end of the day, you have 789, maybe 1015

Justin Musiek:

other people that you're accountable for that need to

Justin Musiek:

learn how to fish, if you will. And if you can multiply those

Justin Musiek:

efforts, you're gonna win long term.

Wesleyne Greer:

Yeah. And sometimes I found that it's

Wesleyne Greer:

really just about relinquishing that control, right. So as that

Wesleyne Greer:

player coach, you probably have some key accounts and

Wesleyne Greer:

relationships that you have been doing or working on for many,

Wesleyne Greer:

many years. And so And because I know it's hard to let go, I

Wesleyne Greer:

always recommend them, like, just bring a salesperson with

Wesleyne Greer:

you on the sales calls, right? Let them watch you in the

Wesleyne Greer:

element, right? Because everything that you do should be

Wesleyne Greer:

a development thing. Anything customer facing is development,

Wesleyne Greer:

when you're talking to operations or customer service,

Wesleyne Greer:

or marketing, whoever is your successor, right? Because you

Wesleyne Greer:

shouldn't be training your successor as a sales manager, I

Wesleyne Greer:

think that's to get into a whole nother ball of wax. But again,

Wesleyne Greer:

like have your team shadow you so they get the same skills,

Wesleyne Greer:

because eventually you'll relinquish those things, and

Wesleyne Greer:

then you can start thinking about your career trajectory,

Wesleyne Greer:

you can start watching what your boss is doing. So you can, you

Wesleyne Greer:

know, move on up the ladder.

Justin Musiek:

You know, if you're a football fan, Nick

Justin Musiek:

Saban, Alabama votes, a lot of these coaches will say the same

Justin Musiek:

thing. You know, they went a lot of football games, their hall of

Justin Musiek:

famers, you know, as coaches, but really, the indication of

Justin Musiek:

their success is what have I left the program? And who have I

Justin Musiek:

groomed to take over? And am I leaving the program in good

Justin Musiek:

hands to continue that success? And that should be the case,

Justin Musiek:

certainly with sales leadership, as well.

Wesleyne Greer:

Absolutely. So tell me you've had 15 years of

Wesleyne Greer:

experience. you're relatively new in this role, but I know

Wesleyne Greer:

that you've been successful. Tell me about a person, a team,

Wesleyne Greer:

a project, something that you're really, really excited about

Wesleyne Greer:

accomplishing? Oh, man,

Justin Musiek:

so I've definitely gravitated towards

Justin Musiek:

kind of startups, environments, maybe not startup companies, per

Justin Musiek:

se, but in some of my prior roles, without getting too

Justin Musiek:

specific, I've joined divisions that are new and are growing in

Justin Musiek:

different medical spaces. Certainly cave Farms is a

Justin Musiek:

growing smaller, you know, company that's growing

Justin Musiek:

aggressively. I like to seek that type of challenge and

Justin Musiek:

environment out. So I've been fortunate to be like at the kind

Justin Musiek:

of the front end of some of these types of divisions that

Justin Musiek:

are developing new products that are coming out potentially that

Justin Musiek:

are changing the medical space. So to me, like just generally

Justin Musiek:

speaking, I love that challenge of being able to leave my

Justin Musiek:

footprint, if you will, on a small organization that's

Justin Musiek:

growing and growing quickly circle. You know, I think I've

Justin Musiek:

had a lot of medical sales experience or certainly that's

Justin Musiek:

where I draw from but You know, in a prior medical device role

Justin Musiek:

and a couple of what was more more than a year long sales that

Justin Musiek:

were high level hospital sales at MIT, Clemson 1214 16 months

Justin Musiek:

to close, and you go through these incredible peaks and

Justin Musiek:

valleys during that process. But it can be disheartening at times

Justin Musiek:

and thrilling at the same time. And just having sold a couple of

Justin Musiek:

these big types of units into a hospital is a real, in my

Justin Musiek:

opinion, it's a real accomplishment. In today's

Justin Musiek:

healthcare environment, there used to be about two to three

Justin Musiek:

decision makers were involved with a capital decision in a

Justin Musiek:

hospital, right a capital equipment decision. And now it's

Justin Musiek:

on average 11 or 12 people that you have to you know,

Justin Musiek:

stakeholders that you have to pull in and really engage in

Justin Musiek:

order to get Sookie sold into a hospital. So, you know, to me, I

Justin Musiek:

was able to do that in a smaller division at Boston Scientific,

Justin Musiek:

which is very, very exciting. And I felt very relieved,

Justin Musiek:

obviously, to get the sale and get the PIO. But it was a matter

Justin Musiek:

of pride that we were able to see it through for such a long

Justin Musiek:

sales cycle. And that it was something that really benefited

Justin Musiek:

the patients moving forward to the hospital. And it's nice,

Justin Musiek:

even now, I still talk to some of the folks that work at the

Justin Musiek:

hospital. And there's some great patient success with it. So it's

Justin Musiek:

about the building portion, the building story, but at the end

Justin Musiek:

of the day, making sure you're doing something that's really

Justin Musiek:

affecting patient care in a positive way for patients for

Justin Musiek:

their families and for the clinicians involved.

Wesleyne Greer:

Yeah, and I think at the end of the day,

Wesleyne Greer:

that's what makes a great salesperson, a great sales

Wesleyne Greer:

leader, and definitely a great sales trainer, because you're

Wesleyne Greer:

always connecting it back to the higher purpose to what is the

Wesleyne Greer:

business problem, what is really the bigger picture that the

Wesleyne Greer:

client is trying to see. And one thing that you said that I want

Wesleyne Greer:

to kind of jump in on is you mentioned that your sales cycle

Wesleyne Greer:

was 12 to 14 months. And one thing that I see a lot of

Wesleyne Greer:

companies do wrong is they get new salespeople, and they expect

Wesleyne Greer:

them to start producing immediately or in two months or

Wesleyne Greer:

three months. And I'm always under the belief that it takes a

Wesleyne Greer:

good salesperson anywhere from six to 24 months to become

Wesleyne Greer:

autonomous. And so if your expectations are less than six

Wesleyne Greer:

months, and if you're selling six figures, seven figure deal,

Wesleyne Greer:

this is going to be longer, because it's a longer sales

Wesleyne Greer:

cycle. There's a lot more decision makers, there's a lot

Wesleyne Greer:

more red tape you have to go through. So I think really that

Wesleyne Greer:

story that you shared with how you were able to push through

Wesleyne Greer:

and you're still talking to those people many years later,

Wesleyne Greer:

because you are passionate about the work that you did. And it

Wesleyne Greer:

took you so long to win the PIO that you got that satisfaction

Wesleyne Greer:

at the end.

Justin Musiek:

No doubt. And I you know, you can't do it. You

Justin Musiek:

think about different points in your development and sales. And

Justin Musiek:

I think about my best managers, were not necessarily my

Justin Musiek:

favorites, right? They're not your best friend, but they were

Justin Musiek:

the ones at times that gave you the really hard, critical

Justin Musiek:

feedback you needed to become a better professional. And I think

Justin Musiek:

that's important as you think about new managers and trainers

Justin Musiek:

and field rides and continuing to develop a training

Justin Musiek:

curriculum. As you know, you don't want to just check the box

Justin Musiek:

with with your rep, you do really need to provide some of

Justin Musiek:

that honest feedback when if you see it you that sounds obvious,

Justin Musiek:

but having hard conversations is not ever easy, just in general.

Justin Musiek:

So

Wesleyne Greer:

yeah, the best sales managers are the ones that

Wesleyne Greer:

you know, after they give you feedback or tell you hey, do

Wesleyne Greer:

this or do that you go and you're like in the back of your

Wesleyne Greer:

mind, like oh my gosh, they get on my last nerves, blah, blah,

Wesleyne Greer:

blah, blah, then you get over that and you go do what they

Wesleyne Greer:

say. And you're like, oh, yeah, but I guess they actually knew

Wesleyne Greer:

what they were talking about. But you never tell them right?

Wesleyne Greer:

You never say oh yeah, it works. You just do it. Awesome.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome. So Justin, this has been an amazing, amazing time. I

Wesleyne Greer:

really enjoy chatting with you. I really learning about the

Wesleyne Greer:

trajectory of your career and how you have built a training

Wesleyne Greer:

program department within your company. Thank you for joining

Wesleyne Greer:

today.

Justin Musiek:

Thank you so much. I love what you're doing.

Justin Musiek:

Thanks for having me. Appreciate it.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome. And that guys was a another episode

Wesleyne Greer:

of the Snack size sales podcast, remember and whatever you do,

Wesleyne Greer:

transform your sales and we'll see you next time.

Wesleyne Greer:

Thank you for joining us today on the snack sized sales

Wesleyne Greer:

podcast. If you enjoyed this episode, subscribe and leave us

Wesleyne Greer:

a review. Learn how to continue increasing your bottom line by

Wesleyne Greer:

getting simplified sales strategies delivered to your

Wesleyne Greer:

inbox weekly by going to www dot snack sized sales.com. Trust me,

Wesleyne Greer:

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